Historic Washington DC

On a recent trip to Washington DC my hubby and I (who share a love for history) went on the search for a neurological workout.

It’s easy here to find a museum or gallery. They are plentiful, varied and not too far from each other.

Our choices were the Library of Congress, the National Portrait Gallery and the National museum of American History.

I really was a day filled with awesomeness!

In 1800 John Adams, the President signed a bill describing a reference library for Congress “such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress – and for putting up a suitable apartment for containing them therein…”

Suitable apartment…

Library of Congress, Washington DC

We didn’t know what to expect, although we had heard it was the most underrated tourist stop in the city.

As soon as you enter The Library of Congress your head tilts up. It was glorious.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

It’s all very Italian Renaissance.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

1814 the invading British troops set fire to the Capitol Building, where the original small library was housed, burning and pillaging it’s contents. Ouch.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Retired President Thomas Jefferson offered his personal library having spent 50 years accumulating books, “putting by everything which related to America, and indeed whatever was rare and valuable in every science”.

His library was considered to be one of the finest in the United States.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Jefferson’s eclectic collection of books resulted in a flood of books, pamphlets, maps, music, prints, and photographs being offered to the growing library.

Facing a shortage of shelf space at the Capitol, Congress excepted the need for a new building.

In 1873 Congress authorized a competition to design plans for the new Library and so this incredible national monument and “the largest, the costliest, and the safest” library building in the world was born.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

And it certainly is impressive!

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

All the sculptural and painted decoration was achieved by more than 50 American artists.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

To see the actual library i.e. where the books are, you have to queue to go up the stairs where you get to look down into the studious area.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Today it holds the world’s largest collection of legal materials, films, maps, sheet music and sound recordings.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Pretty cool heh?

A beautiful dome caps the library.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Outside the sky opened and the rain poured down. So, we explored upstairs a little more.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Luckily for us, we found a room full of historic pieces on display.

It was a small but exciting exhibition ‘Exploring the Early Americas’.

They transport you into indigenous cultures, the dramatic encounters between Native Americans and European explorers and settlers, and the important changes caused by the meeting of these different worlds.

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

I really loved these. There’s something about a beautiful map, don’t you think?

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Enjoying the fresh air after our neurological explosion we strolled past the Supreme Court,

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Library of Congress, Washington DC

Historic Washington DC

and Senate offices.

Historic Washington DC

We fancied a coffee so popped into Union Station.

It was the first building to be made of white granite, previously only used for headstones (bit grim).

Historic Washington DC

This bronze bell is the Freedom bell, a replica of the Liberty Bell which symbolises Americas Independence.

Historic Washington DC

Annoyingly for us much of the inside was behind scaffolding on our visit. Tho’ the food and shop hall was still quite a sight.

Historic Washington DC

I thought it looked cool, especially in black and white…

Historic Washington DC

Hubby had a hankering for the National Portrait Gallery, so after a spot of lunch we head off there.

I have to say, I enjoyed gazing into famous faces, taking them in.

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This is the earliest know portrait of Thomas Jefferson.

He was President, but was also author of the Declaration of Independence, he was responsible for Religious Freedom in Virginia and also founded the city’s University. Good man.

Historic Washington DC

John Adams (saw a mini series of him once- it was good, look out for it).

He was George Washington’s Vice President and the President himself, tho’ proclaimed ‘No man who ever held the office of President would ever congratulate a friend on obtaining it’.

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A photograph of the unmistakable Abraham Lincoln and his faint, tired smile.

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Franklin Roosevelt was the President who was in office during the Great Depression. His economic measures changed the redefined the government’s role in American’s life.

He was very popular and got voted in 4 terms.

This portrait was around World War II when he would have been meeting Winston Churchill.

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Nixon (you can’t admire them all..)

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In other areas art expressed difficult times in American history.

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I recognised this crazy looking bloke. Albert Einstein was actually German but emigrated to America in the 30’s. He was good at maths.

Einstein

Some faces meant nothing to me but I liked them none the less.

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We enjoyed this photo album-esk gallery. You should check it out if you get the chance. You’ll be amazed at how many time you say ‘Oh, look, it’s…’

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Our final trip out that day was the National museum of American History.

You get to see a lot of cool things here. Like this Huey, which served in Vietnam. They carried troops low and slow into battle landing in clearings barely larger than the sweep of their motors.

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Hubby took his time, connecting dates with English history and occasionally checking facts with me. Sweet that he thinks I retain information like he does – sadly I don’t, which is why I like to write things down, so I ‘erm’, tilt my head and even just stare blankly at him, until he works it out himself.

museum Washington dc

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Abraham Lincoln’s hat! He was the first American President to be assassinated and in death became a martyr for National unity and equality.

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You get to see things the Presidents children would have played with in The White House,

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and Michelle Obama’s Inauguration dress.

dress in museum

This yellow silk gown was worn by Jacqueline Kennedy at her first State dinner.

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Away from the Presidents area there was this. The first Apple computer. One for my Dad.

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Muhammed Ali’s boxing gloves.

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And I was strangely thrilled to see the original Elmo. I think he was thrilled to see me too.

Elmo - Historic Washington DC

We thoroughly enjoyed exploring the historic side to Washington DC. There are many many more galleries and Museums to visit within a small area. So, it’s a great city if you like this sort of thing.

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3 Comments - Write a Comment

  1. That explains why you always go cross eyed when I get into the chronology of Roman Emperors! 🤓I’ll stick to favourite Dog breeds in future 🙂

    Great post HB 😉 x

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